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The history of American women"s voluntary organizations, 1810-1960 a guide to sources by Karen J. Blair

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Published by G.K. Hall in Boston, Mass .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States

Subjects:

  • Women -- United States -- Societies and clubs -- History -- 19th century -- Bibliography.,
  • Women -- United States -- Societies and clubs -- History -- 20th century -- Bibliography.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes index.

StatementKaren J. Blair.
SeriesG.K. Hall women"s studies publications
Classifications
LC ClassificationsZ7964.U49 B53 1989, HQ1904 B53 1989
The Physical Object
Paginationxvii, 363 p. ;
Number of Pages363
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2043128M
ISBN 100816186480
LC Control Number88019946

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Rubles. Rubles Russia 1kg Kilo Silv People's Voluntary Corps Minin Pozharsky Pf. $1, The history of the teachers’ reform efforts helps to document changing attitudes and shifting discourses as to the effect of reforms, such as women’s economic freedom and family planning, on American family life (Chafe, ; O’Neill, ; Tax, ). The astonishing proliferation of such voluntary associations from ±60 was, as Stuart Blumin observes, ``one of the [era's] outstanding characteristics without parallel in American history.''29 In eighteenth-century America, a vital tradition of metropolitan conversation had been kept alive through the oral performances of an.